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Multiple scene editing and compilation

I have a project consisting of multiple scenes. I would prefer to edit (and likely revise) each scene individually, then finally combine then into the final version. What is the best way to accomplish this with minimal quality loss?
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  • Hi James-

    Which version of Nero are you using?

    I assume you mean that you have a single video file containing all the scenes. Import your file into Nero Video, Make Advanced Movie and add it to the timeline. If you know where your scenes start and end (you don't need to use the scene detection tool), right click anywhere in the grey area of the timeline upper time scale and select Enable WorkSpace. Position the beginning and ending black markers to encompass a scene. Click on Export, Export to file. Select the file format you would like to use and then export. Repeat for each scene. You can then edit each file separately and then export again. Then import all the final files into one project.

    If my assumption is incorrect, please let me know.
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  • Hi Wither-

    Platinum 2019

    Actually I am creating each scene from original camera and audio sources. I planned to edit each scene as an individual project. Thus I could continue to make modifications to each scene independently until they are all optimized and approved, then combine them together for the finished product.
    All material was shot 1080p 59 and I would like to maintain the best quality for the final version. My concern was exporting each scene, then re-importing them to the final project, then encoding again for the completed file. The final format will be mp4 (Quicktime).

    BTW - Thanks for your quick reply.

    Jim
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  • 1
    You can import a scene, make edits, and then use the Save or Save As to save it as a project (.nvc). Since one can only open one project at a time, eventually you'll need to export each project to file and then combine those files. For the export, the mpeg-4 format seems to be what you would want.

    Nero Video will maintain the original resolution and aspect ratio unless you choose a movie option that is for a lesser specification. In your case, you would want to select HDTV Full HD. You can set that in Options, Movie Options. Obviously, if you were going to burn a DVD-Video, it wouldn't matter since it uses 720x.. for the resolution.
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  • 1
    Jim,

    I agree with Wither 1 about the Movie Option selection, but I think you want to use the AVC format when exporting:



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  • 1
    I don't know why that would be better but it would be suitable. Since he wants to use Quicktime, the MPEG4 Quick Time profile would seem to be the best way to go.
    • Wither 1,

      There are many answers that you can find using Google, such as:

      "H.264 is a new standard for video compression which has more advanced compression methods than the basic MPEG-4 compression. One of the advantages of H.264 is the high compression rate. It is about 1.5 to 2 times more efficient than MPEG-4 encoding. This high compression rate makes it possible to record more information on the same hard disk.
      The image quality is also better and playback is more fluent than with basic MPEG-4 compression. The most interesting feature however is the lower bit-rate required for network transmission.
      So the 3 main advantages of H.264 over MPEG-4 compression are:
      ‐ Small file size for longer recording time and better network transmission.
      ‐ Fluent and better video quality for real time playback
      ‐ More efficient mobile surveillance application

      H264 is now enshrined in MPEG4 as part 10 also known as AVC
      "

      from What is the difference between H.264 video and MPEG-4 video?

      Plus He can probably use hardware acceleration to speed up the encoding.
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  • Thank you, both for the great info and timely responses.

    In the previous millennium, when I began my broadcast TV career, the recording format was 2" quad tape, and the editing methodology had only recently advanced from physical splicing to crude electronic insert editing. Computer controlled machine to machine editing was still a few years into the future.
    One early stereo music project I worked on could only be editing using the physical cutting process, as we had appropriated the machine's cue track to carry the second audio track. The machines of that era were only monophonic and the cue track was normally used to control the machines editing functions. Learning to use a Smith Splicer to literally "cut" and splice quad tape was an amazing and humbling experience. Each edit would take a number of minutes for a expert technician to complete. AND... even if the edit was physically successful and didn't cause the playback to breakup, there still remained a 50% chance that the splice was not between the correct sequential color frames, thus causing a color flash frame. That meant disassembling the splice and removing 1 frame from one side and two frames from the other and doing it all again. Those were the good old days?

    If you're interested...
    Smith Splicer article mentioning the 37 steps to making an edit:
    http://www.vtoldboys.com/editingmuseu...
    And a mostly factual explanation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkYN7...

    Thanks, again

    Jim Swick
    • Jim,

      You've taken me back in time! Not that I've ever edited the films, but I was involved for a few years in the 70s and then in the 90s with cinetheodolites and equipment to read/analyze the recordings from them. Cinetheodolite.

      I don't remember much about it all except that we once contracted for a film reading system that used optical discs that were about a foot in diameter and maybe 1/2 inch thick that could record about 20 minutes of B/W VGA video! I tried to find some accurate information but Google failed me, or I failed it?.
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